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Scottish Sea Glass

Jewellery Designer Gaynor Hebden-Smith creates bespoke, hand-crafted pieces of jewellery and accessories using a contemporary combination of reclaimed sea glass, sterling silver, metals, beads and crystals. All sea glass used in her designs are collected from the beautiful coastlines of Scotland’s beaches.

The glass used has found its way into the sea; either accidentally or through littering. Over the years, the power of the sea naturally breaks and tumbles the glass, resulting in the uniquely shaped, smooth and frosted pieces of sea treasure.

As no two pieces of sea glass found and used are ever the same, wearers know that a piece of Scottish Sea Glass is truly one of a kind.

Just lovely!

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Juniper and Jane

Juniper and Jane is a small, award-winning, design company founded by textile artist, Jane Hunter and her partner, designer, Sam Kilday.

The couple design and produce distinctive homeware and gift products with a particular focus on iconic and rugged outdoor themes.

Often found exploring Scotland from coastline to summits, Jane and Sam literally draw inspiration form the land, then take sketches back to their Ayrshire studio to prepare them for the printing process.

Juniper and Jane products are proudly made in the UK form high quality, natural materials.

Jane and Sam are lovely, and we are proud to showcase their work at Mansefield Studios.

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The Big Reveal

We’ve painted, we’ve scrubbed, we’ve designed, we’ve stocked, and we can now reveal the wonderful new look of Mansefield Studios.

Showcasing the work of many more Scottish designer and makers, the Gallery is full of lovely, pretty things. Jewellery, pottery, textiles, lambswool accessories, candles and soap. Gifts galore whatever the occasion.

Come and visit! Open Monday to Saturday 10.30 – 5.30.

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Harris Tweed – we love it!

Harris Tweed is stunning. Harris Tweed is special. Not all tweeds are HARRIS TWEED!

To meet the legally-prescribed definition of Harris Tweed, tweed has to adhere to a strict specification: a tweed must have been hand-woven by the islanders at their home in the Outer Hebrides and made from pure virgin wool dyed and spun in the Outer Hebrides. Tweed that does not comply with these conditions is not Harris Tweed and cannot be marketed as such.

Originally this handmade fabric was woven by crofters for personal use, ideal for protection against the cold climate of the North of Scotland. Surplus cloth was often traded or used as barter, eventually becoming a form of currency amongst the islanders: it wasn’t unusual for rents to be paid in blankets or lengths of cloth. By the end of the 18th Century, the spinning of wool yarn from local raw materials was a staple industry for crofters. Finished handmade cloth was exported to the Scottish mainland.

The Harris Tweed Authority is the legally appointed governing body responsible for upholding the integrity of Harris Tweed in accordance with the Harris Tweed Act of 1993.

Today, every 50 metres of Harris Tweed are checked by an inspector from the Harris Tweed Authority before being stamped, by hand, with the Orb Mark. The Orb Mark trademark certifies its hand crafted origins.

The stunning colours in the yarn are derived from the colours of the hills and land of the Outer Hebrides.

A well-balanced mixture of exquisite colours in the yarn, together with the luxurious texture of the cloth, ensures that everything made from it becomes an instant classic.

See? We love Harris Tweed!

 

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Heather McDermott Jewellery

We are delighted to be stocking the wonderful jewellery of Heather McDermott. Hailing from the Isle of Skye, the continually changing shoreline is a constant source of inspiration to Heather.

The tideline of Skye is a treasure trove of unique objects discarded from the urban environment and deposited by the power of the Hebridean swell. Rope, wood and plastic take on a subtler identity as wind and wave shape, and re-shape form and colour.

The industrial nature of the stainless steel is hand formed into soft geometric shapes mimicking fishing nets and lobster pots. Repetition creates chaotic chain which is then embellished with simple vivid discs of colour inspired by washed up buoys.

Take a look at the Collection.